Movies Of The Year Awards: 1989

Best Picture:

The End: Do The Right Thing
Oscar: Driving Miss Daisy

Best Director:

The End: Spike Lee, Do The Right Thing
Oscar: Oliver Stone, Born On The Fourth Of July

Actor:

The End: Kenneth Branagh. Henry V
Oscar: Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot

Actress:

The End: Meg Ryan, When Harry Met Sally. . .
Oscar: Jessica Tandy, Driving Miss Daisy

Supporting Actor:

The End: Morgan Freeman, Glory
Oscar: Denzel Washington, Glory

Supporting Actress:

The End: Mia Farrow, Crimes And Misdemeanors
Oscar: Brenda Fricker, My Left Foot

Original Screenplay:

The End: Spike Lee, Do The Right Thing
Oscar: Tom Schulman, Dead Poets Society

Adapted Screenplay:

The End: Kevin Jarre, Glory
Oscar: Alfred Uhrey, Driving Miss Daisy

Foreign Language Film:

The End: The Killer
Oscar: Cinema Paradiso

Documentary Feature:

The End: Roger & Me
Oscar: Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt

Film Editing:

The End: Barry Alexander Brown, Do The Right Thing
Oscar: David Brenner and Joe Hutshing, Born On the Fourth Of July

Cinematography:

The End: Ernest Dickerson, Do The Right Thing
Oscar: Freddie Francis, Glory

Art Direction:

The End: Batman
Oscar: Batman

Costume Design:

The End: Henry V
Oscar: Henry V

Make-Up:

The End: Batman
Oscar: Driving Miss Daisy

Sound:

The End: Batman
Oscar: Glory

Sound Effects Editing:

The End: Batman
Oscar: Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade

Visual Effects:

The End: The Abyss
Oscar: The Abyss

Original Score:

The End: Patrick Doyle, Henry V
Oscar: Alan Mencken, The Little Mermaid

Original Song:

The End: “Fight The Power”, Public Enemy, Do The Right Thing
Oscar: “Under The Sea”, Alan mencken and Howard Ashman, The Little Mermaid

Soundtrack:

The End: Say Anything . . .

Movies Of The Year: Best Of The 40s

Back on schedule after an off-week last week, we’re continuing the countdown of the Best Movie Years of each decade. So far, we’ve done the 50s-the 90s, and now we’ll start going backwards with the 40s through the 20s. I’d do the teens as well, but I can’t remember any of most of the pre-1915 movies I’ve seen, or any titles from 1916, so clearly I’m even less competent to rank those years than later decades. As always, there’s no rigorous system involved in my rankings, I just look at the Movies I’ve Seen from each year and pick what I think is the best considering both the quality of the best films (peak value) and the quantity of good films (depth). The goal is to eventually use this to come up with a ranking of the Best Movie Years Of All-Time. Previous Best Ofs can be found on the sidebar, along with my rankings for each individual year.


10. 1942 – You know it’s a strong decade when one of my Top 5 Favorite Films can’t manage to push its year higher than tenth place. Casablanca heads this relatively weak year, along with the best of the Val Lewton films, Jacques Tourneur’s Cat People and a fine Preston Sturges comedy, The Palm Beach Story. Orson Welles’s The Magnificent Ambersons might deserve to rank higher, but I can’t watch it without becoming incredibly depressed at the way it was butchered. Other solid films from this year include Rene Clair’s I Married A Witch, Ernst Lubitsch’s To Be Or Not To Be, and John Farrow’s Wake Island, one of the finest of this decades many great World War II films. Best: Casablanca. Most Overrated: Yankee Doodle Dandy. Most Underrated: I Married A Witch.


9. 1947 – It’s the lack of depth that brings this year down in the rankings. Despite a great Top Three Films in Powell & Pressburger’s Black Narcissus, Jacques Tourneur’s Out Of The Past and Orson Welles’s The Lady From Shanghai, the fact that I’ve only seen 13 films from this year (the least of the decade) can’t help but hold it back. There are some fine noirs this year: Crossfire, Odd Man Out, T-Men, Born To Kill and even Chaplin’s Monsieur Verdoux, in addition to the two mentioned above. And some folks think much more highly of Delmer Daves’s Dark Passage than I do. Best: Black Narcissus. Most Overrated: Gentlemen’s Agreement. Most Underrated: The Lady from Shanghai, I guess.


8. 1945 – Marcel Carné’s massive masterpiece Children Of Paradise tops this year, while its polar opposite one of Akira Kurasawa’s slightest and most low-key films, The Men Who Tread On The Tiger’s Tail comes in second. Fine films from Powell & Pressburger (I Know Where I’m Going!), David Lean (Brief Encounter) and Roberto Rossellini (Rome, Open City) round out a solid, but unspectacular Top Five. This year has more depth than any of the previous ones (films like Detour, Mildred Pierce, The Southerner, The Clock and A Walk In The Sun), but its mediocre peak keeps it from moving higher. Best: Children Of Paradise. Most Overrated: The Lost Weekend. Most Underrated: The Men Who Tread On The Tiger’s Tail.


7. 1943 – A better peak than ’45, but still not an amazing one, led by my favorite Carl Theodor Dreyer film, Day Of Wrath. Powell & Pressburger turn up again (expect them to dominate the director rankings at the end of this post) with The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp. There’s also Busby Berkely’s delirious (is that redundant?) musical The Gang’s All Here, Howard Hawks Air Force, a perfect example of the World War II genre, William Wellman’s The Ox-Bow Incident, Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow Of A Doubt, Akira Kurosawa’s fine first film Sanshiro Sugata and Jaques Tourneur’s Jane Eyre adaptation I Walked With A Zombie. This year isn’t quite as deep as the previous one, but its close. Best: Day Of Wrath. Most Overrated: I can’t think of one. Most Underrated: Air Force.


6. 1946 – From here on out, the peaks are tremendous, with at least a handful of great films every year. This year is topped by Frank Capra’s noir holiday classic It’s A Wonderful Life, Howard Hawks’s The Big Sleep, Powell & Pressburger’s A Matter Of Life And Death, Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious, and John Ford’s My Darling Clementine. Other fine films include: Paisan, Gilda, The Best Years Of Our Lives (which I’m in the midst of rewatching and enjoying a lot more than I did a decade ago), The Killers, and Beauty And The Beast. Best: It’s A Wonderful Life. Most Overrated: The Postman Always Rings Twice. Most Underrated: A Matter Of Life And Death (at least until Criterion puts it out).


5. 1944 – Yet another Powell & Pressburger film tops this year’s list, this time it’s the sublime A Canterbury Tale, narrowly edging Sergei Eisenstein’s Ivan The Terrible Part 1 for the #1 spot. Howard Hawks’s first Bogart and Bacall gem To Have And Have Not is followed by a pair of classic noirs (Laura and Double Indemnity) to round out this terrific Top 5. This year has very slight edges on ’46 in peak and depth, with its other fine films including Lifeboat, The Miracle Of Morgan’s Creek, Meet Me In St. Louis, Gaslight, Henry V and Arsenic & Old Lace. Best: A Canterbury Tale. Most Overrated: Henry V. Most Underrated: A Canterbury Tale.


4. 1941 – The consensus Best Film Of All-Time leads this year, Orson Welles’s magnificently entertaining Citizen Kane (“It’s Terrific!”). It’s followed by John Huston’s foundational noir The Maltese Falcon, a pair of great Preston Sturges comedies (The Lady Eve and Sullivan’s Travels) and a Hitchcock film I seem to like more than anyone else, Suspicion (that may have more to do with Joan Fontaine than anything specific about the film. There’s a lot of other very good films this year as well: Josef von Sternberg’s perverse classic The Shanghai Gesture, John Ford’s Oscar-winning How Green Was My Valley, a lesser-known but nonetheless great Howard Hawks screwball comedy (Ball Of Fire), Kenji Mizoguchi’s epic telling of a famous Japanese legend (The Loyal 47 Ronin), and solid war films from Hawks (Sergeant York) and Powell & Pressburger (49th Parallel). Best: Citizen Kane. Most Overrated: Belle Starr, The Bandit Queen (any rating is too high for it). Most Underrated: The Shanghai Gesture.


3. 1949 – This year’s peak is led by two of the best film’s of the decade: Carol Reed’s The Third Man and Yasujiro Ozu’s Late Spring. The rest of the top films don’t quite measure up to the best peaks of this decade, but this year has the second best depth of the decade, which combined with its incredible Top Two is enough to movie it into the third spot in these rankings. That depth comes from such fine films as: Stray Dog, The Set-Up, Jour de fête, She Wore A Yellow Ribbon, Kind Hearts And Coronets, Thieves’ Highway, A Letter To Three Wives, Battleground, The Fountainhead, Adam’s Rib, Sands Of Iwo Jima, and I Shot Jesse James. Best: The Third Man. Most Overrated: A Letter To Three Wives, but only because there are people in the world so deluded as to think it’s superior to All About Eve. Most Underrated: The Set-Up.


2. 1940 – Terrificly balanced year with an excellent peak and excellent depth. Ernst Lubitsch’s The Shop Around The Corner heads the list, followed by Disney’s Fantasia, Hitchcock’s Rebecca and a pair of perfect screwball comedies: His Girl Friday and The Philadelphia Story. There are great films from comedy legends WC Fields (The Bank Dick) and Charlie Chaplin (The Great Dictator), the pioneering epic fantasy The Thief Of Baghdad and a pair of John Ford films (The Long Voyage Home and The Grapes Of Wrath). Best: The Shop Around The Corner. Most Overrated: Santa fe Trail, because it’s really bad. Most Underrated: The Shop Around The Corner.


1. 1948 – Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s third #1 film this decade, The Red Shoes, tops this year, followed by great films from Howard Hawks (Red River), John Ford (Fort Apache), Marcel Ophuls (Letter From An Unknown Woman), Preston Sturges (Unfaithfully Yours), and Vincente Minnelli (The Pirate). This amazing peak, possibly the best of the decade, is backed by the most depth of the decade as well (this year has the most films I’ve seen of the decade, with 24). The other very good films include: Macbeth, Rope, Portrait Of Jennie, They Live By Night, Force Of Evil, The Naked City, The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre, Hamlet, He Walked By Night and Bicycle Thieves. It’s no coincidence that the top four years on this list are the first and last films of the decade, as World War II, of course, caused massive disruptions in film production around the globe. Best: The Red Shoes. Most Overrated: Bicycle Thieves. Most Underrated: Unfaithfully Yours.

And here’s the director countdown, everyone with at least two films in my Top Tens for each year this decade:

John Ford – 7
Michael Powell- 7 (6 with Emeric Pressburger)
Alfred Hitchcock – 7
Howard Hawks – 7
Preston Sturges – 5
Orson Welles – 5
Vincente Minnelli – 4
Akira Kurosawa – 3
Jacques Tourneur – 3
George Cukor – 3
Robert Wise – 2
Carol Reed – 2
Roberto Rossellini – 2
Frank Capra – 2
Charlie Chaplin – 2
Ernst Lubitsch – 2

Movies Of The Year Awards: 1988

Best Picture:

The End: Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Rain Man

Best Director:

The End: Martin Scorsese, The Last Temptation Of Christ
Oscar: Barry Levinson, Rain Man

Actor:

The End: John Malkovich, Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man

Actress:

The End: Susan Sarandon, Bull Durham
Oscar: Jodie Foster, The Accused

Supporting Actor:

The End: Alan Rickman, Die Hard
Oscar: Kevin Kline, A Fish Called Wanda

Supporting Actress:

The End: Michelle Pfeiffer, Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Geena Davis, The Accidental Tourist

Original Screenplay:

The End: Ron Shelton, Bull Durham
Oscar: Ronald Bass and Barry Morrow, Rain Man

Adapted Screenplay:

The End: Christopher Hampton, Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Christopher Hampton, Dangerous Liaisons

Foreign Language Film:

The End: As Tears Go By
Oscar: Pelle The Conquerer

Documentary Feature:

The End: The Thin Blue Line
Oscar: Hotel Terminus

Film Editing:

The End: Thelma Schoonmaker, The Last Temptation Of Christ
Oscar: Arthur Schmidt, Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Cinematography:

The End: Andrew Lau, As Tears Go By
Oscar: Peter Biziou, Mississippi Burning

Art Direction:

The End: Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Dangerous Liaisons

Costume Design:

The End: Dangerous Liaisons
Oscar: Dangerous Liaisons

Make-Up:

The End: Beetlejuice
Oscar: Beetlejuice

Sound:

The End: Die Hard
Oscar: Bird

Sound Effects Editing:

The End: Die Hard
Oscar: Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Visual Effects:

The End: Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Oscar: Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Original Score:

The End: Mason Daring, Eight Men Out
Oscar: Dave Grusin, The Milagro Beanfield War

Soundtrack:

The End: Bull Durham

Movie Roundup: Her? Edition

Still flabbergasted by McCain’s VP choice, but enjoying the vetting process being done in the press that his campaign should have done months ago. Here’s what I’ve seen recently:

Pineapple Express – Stoner action comedy from The Apatow Group. Directed by David Gordon Green, who’s George Washington was quite pretty, I was hoping he might bring a unique visual style to an Apatow film, something we haven’t seen yet from those folks. Alas, but for a few nicely quiet moments, it looks pretty much like any other film. Still, it’s reasonably funny. And as a parody of the action genre, I enjoyed it more than Hot Fuzz, a film a lot of other people think is pretty great.

Get Carter – I like Michael Caine, but this role as a badass gangster looking to solve his brother’s murder seems to call for a Lee Marvin type. Maybe I’ve just always seen Caine in the wrong kind of film. Anyway, this is a pretty solid post-noir film, not as experimental as John Boorman’s Point Blank, or satirical like Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye, or as arty as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up, or as good as any of those films. But this seems like a family of films that I’m sure somebody’s studied. The quite excellent Out Of The Past podcast has ignored this period of noir, however. Well, with the exception of Chinatown, which is a period film. The crime film went in interesting directions after the collapse of the studio system: more graphic in terms of violence and sexuality, more extreme politically in terms of both fascism (arguably Dirty Harry and The French Connection) and existential nihilism (Chinatown and The Long Goodbye). Get Carter‘s pretty explicit, but I know how ambitious it is as a statement about anything. The #9 film of 1971.

Reel Paradise – John Pierson, an indie film producer and author of the book Spike, Mike, Slackers and Dykes (which I read a long time ago and recall being a fun read) goes to Fiji to run a free theatre for a year. This documentary chronicles his time there, but spends far too much time following the soap opera of his family as they adjust to the new country (I really didn’t care about any of that) and very little on the actual cinema. Compared to Henri Langlois: Phantom Of The Cinematheque, another documentary about a guy running a theatre, this film captures almost one of the sheer joy of showing movies that so motivates these guys. The #48 film of 2005.

Beach Red – With this and The Naked Prey, Cornel Wilde showed himself to be a quite interesting director of thoughtful action pictures. Its too bad he doesn’t appear to have gotten more opportunities to direct. This WW2 film has a hole lot in common with Malick The Thin Red Line, in both films, the narrative of a US assault on a Japanese-held island is broken up by flashbacks as the soldiers try to reconcile their past lives with the horrors of their present. What Wilde doesn’t really have is Malick’s eye for beautiful imagery or his ability to create a lyrically dreamlike narrative flow. Instead, his technique is more straight-forward along the lines of Sam Peckinpah or Samuel Fuller. The combination of poetic construction and prose visual style is oddly jarring, but not exactly enjoyable. I should probably see this again. The #19 film of 1967.

Tropic Thunder – A bit funnier than Pineapple Express, but neither is particularly great cinema. Ben Stiller’s only mildly annoying, Nick Nolte and Steve Coogan are underused, Jack Black isn’t given a single interesting thing to do, Tom Cruise is reasonably funny, but Robert Downey Jr, and just about everything about his character, is brilliant. The film is worth seeing for him alone. Right now, on the strength of this and [i]Iron Man[/i] he’s the leading candidate for my Best Actor award. I’m sure he’s very excited after just missing the Supporting Actor award for Less Than Zero.

Howl’s Moving Castle – I finally managed to watch a second Hayao Miyazaki film and I wasn’t disappointed. The plot, as far as I can tell, doesn’t make the least bit of sense, but this is a stunningly beautiful movie (and it looks fantastic on my TV, why isn’t there a Blu-Ray of this yet?). Most impressive for me: the way Miyazaki shifts the age of the main character so suddenly within a scene. I’m watching a scene and all of a sudden realize the main character has gotten 30 years younger and I’ve no idea how long she’s been that way. I can’t really explain why I find that so exciting. Anyway, I liked this much more than Mononoke, which I recall as been really hampered by a generic environmental politics message. The #9 film of 2004.

The Smiling Lieutenant – I may have liked this the best of all the Lubitsch Musicals in the recent Eclipse boxset, and that’s not entirely because I really just don’t care for Jeannette MacDonald, who stars in the other three. This one’s got Claudette Colbert and Miriam Hopkins vying for Maurice Chevalier’s affections. He’s the soldier who gets roped into marrying a princess (Hopkins) despite already having a girlfriend (Colbert). Colbert follows him to the princess’ country and some surprising complications ensue. It’s also the least musical of the set, which helps, since most of the songs in these films are, at minimum, not very memorable. The #10 film of 1931.

One Hour With You – The last and least of these Lubitsch Musicals. chevalier and MacDonald play a happily married couple who dally with infidelity but reunite. What can I say? I guess I prefer the Lubitsch non-musicals. These films aren’t without a historical interest, an they all have a certain charm (I don’t think Lubitsch can fail to be pleasant), but they simply can’t compare with greats like The Shop Around The Corner, To Be Or Not To Be, Trouble In Paradise or Ninotchka. The #13 film of 1932.

Johnny Guitar – Now here’s a film that lived up to the hype an was everything I’d hoped it would be. Nicholas Ray’s Western’s got just about everything going for it: complex and endlessly fascinating gender politics, a Joan Crawford always teetering on the edge of camp hysteria, Sterling Hayden in a fine reluctant gunfighter performance, Ward Bond, Ernest Borgnine, John Carradine and Mercedes McCambridge doing fine work in supporting roles, especially McCambridge as the violently repressed villain, Nicholas Ray’s personal fear of isolation and loneliness. This movie needs to be seen again and again and again. The #4 film of 1954.

Two-Faced Woman – Greta Garbo plays a ski instructor who marries the rich Melvyn Douglas on a whim. When the two start to fight, she pretends to be her own vivacious twin sister to test his fidelity. He fails, of course, but some how she learns her lesson and is put in her place. Pretty retrograde, I guess, and not nearly as charming as Ninotchka, the previous pairing of these two stars, despite the great George Cukor directing. The #17 film of 1941.

Two-Headed Spy – Just a coincidence with the two “Two”s back to back, I swear. This is an Andre DeToth WW2 film about a British spy who just happened to be a general in the German army and his efforts to help the Allies and undermine the German cause. If true, a remarkable story, but there seems to be some doubt about its reality. Regardless, Jack Hawkins is very fine in the lead role, and DeToth, a director some hold in high regard who I’ve little experience with, directs with a restrained, realist style that somewhat recalls Martn Ritt’s The Spy Who Came In From The Cold, without that film’s overwhelming sense of melancholy. The #18 film of 1958.

Rage In Heaven – Ingrid Bergman is at the center of a love triangle between crazy Robert Montgomery and awesome George Sanders. She marries Montgomery but loves Sanders, which makes Montgomery even crazier until he becomes violent, both toward animals and people. Directed by WS Van Dyke (among others) it’s lacking the noir feel and visual style that this plot would have received had it been made a decade later. Instead, it’s more of a social problem film with a rather silly race against the clock to solve the crime denouement. The #16 film of 1941.

A Man Escaped – My latest Robert Bresson film, the title sums up the plot pretty well. We are shown a man’s incarceration and his various, painstaking plans for escape in intricate detail. It’s like all the fascinating process elements of a movie like The Great Escape, with all the star personality and action narrative eliminated. What’s left is the details, and the character that grows out of actions rather than an actors persona (or displays of emotion, this being Bresson). The effect is one of extreme realism, making the film that much more suspenseful because it draws the viewer in so much more. The #7 film of 1956.

The Vikings – I liked the opening sequence, with Orson Welles narrating over a Bayeux Tapestry type animation. After that, the film becomes a pretty generic Hollywood period film, along the lines of The Fall Of the Roman Empire or Cleopatra (or Gladiator and Kingdom Of Heaven, though without those films contemporary political aspirations, for that matter). It lacks the hard, slightly perverse edge Stanley Kubrick brought to Spartacus or the silly campy fun of the Ray Harryhausen period films. Kirk Douglas and Tony Curtis play the Vikings, fighting over Janet Leigh and fighting the English (or the Welsh, I’m not sure). I can see why they’d fight over Leigh, as for the rest: bleh. Director Richard Fleischer is well-respected. I can’t believe this is one of his best. The #19 film of 1958.

Movies Of The Year Awards: 1987

Best Picture:

The End: The Princess Bride
Oscar: The Last Emperor

Best Director:

The End: Stanley Kubrick, Full Metal Jacket
Oscar: Bernardo Bertolucci, The Last Emperor

Actor:

The End: Bruno Ganz, Wings Of Desire
Oscar: Michael Douglas, Wall Street

Actress:

The End: Holly Hunter, Broadcast News and Raising Arizona
Oscar: Cher, Moonstruck

Supporting Actor:

The End: William Hurt, Broadcast News
Oscar: Sean Connery, The Untouchables

Supporting Actress:

The End: Olympia Dukakis, Moonstruck
Oscar: Olympia Dukakis, Moonstruck

Original Screenplay:

The End: James L. Brooks, Broadcast News
Oscar: John Patrick Shanley, Moonstruck

Adapted Screenplay:

The End: William Goldman, The Princess Bride
Oscar: Mark Peploe and Bernardo Bertolucci, The Last Emperor

Foreign Language Film:

The End: Wings Of Desire
Oscar: Babette’s Feast

Film Editing:

The End: Martin Hunter, Full Metal Jacket
Oscar: Gabriella Cristiani, The Last Emperor

Cinematography:

The End: Henri Alekan, Wings Of Desire
Oscar: Vittorio Storaro, The Last Emperor

Art Direction:

The End: The Last Emperor
Oscar: The Last Emperor

Costume Design:

The End: The Last Emperor
Oscar: The Last Emperor

Make-Up:

The End: Predator
Oscar: Harry And The Hendersons

Sound:

The End: RoboCop
Oscar: The Last Emperor

Sound Effects Editing:

The End: Predator
Oscar: RoboCop

Visual Effects:

The End: Predator
Oscar: Innerspace

Original Score:

The End: Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne and Cong Su, The Last Emperor
Oscar: Ryuichi Sakamoto, David Byrne and Cong Su, The Last Emperor

Original Song:

The End: “A Hazy Shade Of Winter”, Paul Simon/The Bangles, Less Than Zero
Oscar: “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life”, Franke Previte, John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz, Dirty Dancing

Soundtrack:

The End: Ishtar

Movies Of The Year Awards: 1986

Best Picture:

The End: Hannah And Her Sisters
Oscar: Platoon

Best Director:

The End: Woody Allen, Hannah And Her Sisters
Oscar: Oliver Stone, Platoon

Actor:

The End: James Woods, Salvador
Oscar: Paul Newman, The Color Of Money

Actress:

The End: Isabella Rossellini, Blue Velvet
Oscar: Marlee Matlin, Children Of A Lesser God

Supporting Actor:

The End: Dennis Hopper, Blue Velvet and Hoosiers
Oscar: Michael Caine, Hannah And Her Sisters

Supporting Actress:

The End: Dianne Weist, Hannah And Her Sisters
Oscar: Dianne Weist, Hannah And Her Sisters

Original Screenplay:

The End: Woody Allen, Hannah And Her Sisters
Oscar: Woody Allen, Hannah And Her Sisters

Adapted Screenplay:

The End: Andrew Birkin, Gérard Brach, Howard Franklin and Alain Godard, The Name Of The Rose
Oscar: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, A Room With A View

Foreign Language Film:

The End: A Better Tomorrow
Oscar: The Assault

Film Editing:

The End: Claire Simpson, Platoon and Salvador
Oscar: Claire Simpson, Platoon

Cinematography:

The End: Chris Menges, The Mission
Oscar: Chris Menges, The Mission

Art Direction:

The End: The Name Of The Rose
Oscar: A Room With A View

Costume Design:

The End: The Mission
Oscar: A Room With A View

Make-Up:

The End: The Fly
Oscar: The Fly

Sound:

The End: Aliens
Oscar: Platoon

Sound Effects Editing:

The End: Platoon
Oscar: Aliens

Visual Effects:

The End: Aliens
Oscar: Aliens

Original Score:

The End: Ennio Morricone, The Mission
Oscar: Herbie Hancock, ‘Round Midnight

Original Song:

The End: “If You Leave”, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Pretty In Pink
Oscar: “Take My Breath Away”, Giorgio Moroder & Tom Whitlock, Top Gun

Soundtrack:

The End: Pretty In Pink