1932 Endy Awards

So I decided to go ahead and keep on handing out awards, limiting myself to years in which I’ve seen at least 40 movies to get a good base from which to arbitrarily assign fake trophies. The earliest year from which I’ve seen 40 is 1932, so we’re starting here. As always, eligibility is determined by the year imdb assigns to the film and if I haven’t seen it, I can’t award it. Nominees are listed in alphabetical order and winners are bolded.

Best Picture:

1. One Way Passage
2. Scarface
3. Shanghai Express
4. Trouble in Paradise
5. Vampyr

Best Director:

1. Yasujiro Ozu, I was Born, but. . .
2. Howard Hawks, Scarface
3. Josef von Sternberg, Shanghai Express
4. Ernst Lubitsch, Trouble in Paradise
5. Carl Theodor Dreyer, Vampyr

Best Actor:

1. Boris Karloff, The Mummy
2. Spencer Tracy, Me and My Gal
3. William Powell, One Way Passage
4. Paul Muni, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
5. Herbert Marshall, Trouble in Paradise

Best Actress:

1. Kay Francis, One Way Passage
2. Jean Harlow, Red Dust
3. Marlene Dietrich, Shanghai Express
4. Ann Dvorak, Three on a Match
5. Miriam Hopkins, Trouble in Paradise

Supporting Actor:

1. Harpo Marx, Horse Feathers
2. Bela Lugosi, Island of Lost Souls
3. Charles Laughton, The Island of Lost Souls
4. Lee Tracy, The Strange Love of Molly Louvain
5. Tatsuo Saito, Where Now Are the Dreams of Youth?

Supporting Actress:

1. Glenda Farrell, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
2. Myrna Loy, The Mask of Fu Manchu
3. Claudette Colbert, The Sign of the Cross
4. Anna May Wong, Shanghai Express
5. Kay Francis, Trouble in Paradise

Original Screenplay:

1. Kalmar, Ruby, Johnstone & Perelman, Horse Feathers
2. Geibei Ibushiya, I Was Born, But. . .
3. Wilson Misner & Joseph Jackson, One Way Passage
4. Jules Furthman, Shanghai Express
5. Kogo Noda, Where Now Are the Dreams of Youth?

Adapted Screenplay:

1. Jean Renoir & Albert Valentin, Boudu Saved from Drowning
2. John Mahin, Red Dust
3. Ben Hecht, Scarface
4. Sidney Buchman & Waldemar Young, The Sign of the Cross
5. Samson Raphelson, Trouble in Paradise

Foreign Language Film:

1. Boudu Saved from Drowning
2. I Was Born, But. .
3. No Blood Relation
4. Vampyr
5. Where Now Are the Dreams of Youth?

Live Action Short:

1. The Music Box (James Parrott)

Film Editing:

1. No Blood Relation
2. Scarface
3. Shanghai Express
4. Trouble in Paradise
5. Vampyr

Cinematography:

1. Sol Polito, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang
2. Karl Struss, The Island of Lost Souls
3. Victor Milner, Love Me Tonight & Trouble in Paradise
4. Lee Garmes, Shanghai Express
5. Rudolph Maté, Vampyr

Original Score:

1. Blonde Venus
2. Horse Feathers
3. Love Me Tonight
4. One Hour with You
5. Vampyr

Original Song:

1. “Hot Voodoo”, Blonde Venus
2. “Everyone Says I Love You”, Horse Feathers
3. “I’m Against It”, Horse Feathers
4. “Isn’t It Romantic?”, Love Me Tonight
5. “Mimi”, Love Me Tonight

Art Direction:

1. The Island of Lost Souls
2. The Mask of Fu Manchu
3. Shanghai Express
4. Trouble in Paradise
5. Vampyr

Costume Design:

1. Love Me Tonight
2. The Mask of Fu Manchu
3. Shanghai Express
4. The Sign of the Cross
5. Trouble in Paradise

Make-up:

1. The Island of Lost Souls
2. The Mask of Fu Manchu
3. The Mummy

Sound Mixing:

1. Love Me Tonight
2. Shanghai Express
3. The Sign of the Cross
4. Trouble in Paradise
5. Vampyr

Sound Editing:

1. The Island of Lost Souls
2. Love Me Tonight
3. Scarface
4. Tarzan, the Ape Man
5. Vampyr

Visual Effects:

1. The Crowd Roars
2. The Island of Lost Souls
3. The Mask of Fu Manchu
4. The Mummy
5. Vampyr

This Week in Rankings

These are the movies I’ve watched or rewatched over the last week or so, along with where they place in my year-by-year rankings. I’ve linked each to my short reviews on letterboxd as well. As you can see, I’ve been watching a lot of Johnnie To-related movies in preparation for a new episode of They Shot Pictures (check out the recently posted episode on Mikio Naruse). I also revived the Endy Awards (2011 and 2012), look for more of that kind of thing in the coming weeks.

A Better Tomorrow – 1, 1986
City on Fire – 9, 1987
Porco Rosso – 6, 1992
Pom Poko – 8, 1994
Comrades: Almost a Love Story – 1, 1996
Too Many Ways to Be No. 1 – 7, 1997

Where a Good Man Goes – 15, 1999
Needing You – 10, 2000
Fulltime Killer – 14, 2001
The Heroic Duo – 26, 2003
Moonrise Kingdom – 1, 2012
Argo – 50, 2012

2011 Endy Awards

After not being able to see many movies before Oscartime last year, due to baby-induced home-boundness, I’d always meant to come back and do a proper awards post for 2011, something I’d forgot about until putting together the awards for 2012 this past week. So with Endies on the mind, I guess now is as good a time as any to reward the best of what I’ve seen from 2011. As always, eligibility is determined by the date given by imdb. I’ll list the nominees in each category in alphabetical order and the winner will be in bold.


Best Picture:

1. Damsels in Distress
2. The Day He Arrives
3. The Deep Blue Sea
4. Margaret
5. The Tree of Life

Best Director:

1. Hong Sangsoo, The Day He Arrives
2. Terence Davies, The Deep Blue Sea
3. Johnnie To, Don’t Go Breaking My Heart
4. Kenneth Lonergan, Margaret
5. Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life

Best Actor:

1. Jack Black, Bernie
2. Alex Ross Perry, The Color Wheel
3. Liam Neesen, The Grey
4. Michael Shannon, Take Shelter
5. Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Best Actress:

1. Greta Gerwig, Damsels in Distress
2. Rachel Weisz, The Deep Blue Sea
3. Anne Marsen, Girl Walk // All Day
4. Anna Paquin, Margaret
5. Leila Hatami, A Separation

The actor category for this year is merely OK, but this might be the strongest group of actresses ever. Can’t believe there’s no room for Tilda Swinton in We Need to Talk About Kevin, Gao Yuanyuan in Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, Carlen Altman in The Color Wheel, Michelle Williams in Take this Waltz, Jessica Chastain in Take Shelter and Charlize Theron in Young Adult.

Supporting Actor:

1. Sonny Carl Davis, Bernie
2. Tom Hiddleston, The Deep Blue Sea
3. John Doyle, Girl Walk // All Day
4. Lau Ching-wan, Life Without Principle
5. Brad Pitt, The Tree of Life

Supporting Actress:

1. Megalyn Echikunwoke, Damsels in Distress
2. Carrie MacLemore, Damsels in Distress
2. Cécile De France, The Kid with a Bike
3. Denise Ho, Life Without Principle
5. J. Smith-Cameron, Margaret

Original Screenplay:

1. Whit Stillman, Damsels in Distress
2. Hong Sangsoo, The Day He Arrives
3. Milkyway Team, Don’t Go Breaking My Heart
4. Kenneth Lonergan, Margaret
5. Lee Kwangkuk, Romance Joe

Adapted Screenplay:

1. Richard Linklater, Bernie
2. Terence Davies, The Deep Blue Sea
3. Craig Schulz & Stephan Pastis, Happiness is a Warm Blanket, Charlie Brown
4. John Logan, Hugo
5. Lynne Ramsay & Rory Kinnear, We Need to Talk About Kevin

Foreign Language Film:

1. The Day He Arrives (Hong Sangsoo)
2. Don’t Go Breaking My Heart (Johnnie To)
3. Romance Joe (Lee Kwangkuk)
4. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi)
5. Wuxia (Peter Chan)

A great year for Johnnie To and his collaborators at his Milkyway Image studio, with two of my favorite films of the year. Unfortunately, they came up short awards-wise, barely beaten out in the supporting acting categories and edged by masterful work in directing and original screenplay. Foreign Language film was probably their best shot, but Hong Sangsoo’s The Day He Arrives is one of his best.

Documentary Feature:

1. All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace (Adam Curtis)
2. Crazy Horse (Frederick Wiseman)
3. Fragments: Surviving Pieces of Lost Films
4. Pina (Wim Wenders)
5. The Story of Film: An Odyssey (Mark Cousins)

Animated Feature:

1. The Adventures of Tintin
2. Happiness is a Warm Blanket, Charlie Brown
3. Rango
4. Winnie the Pooh

The best Peanuts special since The Great Pumpkin, seamlessly integrating the classic strips and characters into modern animation techniques (POV shots, computer-rendered crane shots) while respecting and preserving the unique stylization of Charles Schulz’s original drawings.

Animated Short:

1. La Luna

Live Action Short:

1. La belle epoque (Hou Hsiao-hsien)
2. Green Island Serenade (Hou Chi-jan)
3. Key (Leon Dai)
4. Ritual (Wang Toon)
5. Unwritten Rules (Cheng Yu-chieh)

These are all part of the Taiwan Film Festival’s compendium 10 + 10, a series of 20 short films by 10 veteran and 10 younger Taiwanese directors. A mild upset here as Hou Hsiao-hsien was the heavy favorite, but Hou Chi-jan’s swoon-inducing musical time travel picture won me over.

Film Editing:

1. A Dangerous Method
2. The Day He Arrives
3. The Deep Blue Sea
4. Life Without Principle
5. The Tree of Life

Cinematography:

1. Florian Hoffmesiter, The Deep Blue Sea
2. Gökhan Tiryaki, Once Upon a Time in Anatolia
3. Emmanuel Lubezki, The Tree of Life
4. Janusz Kaminski, War Horse
5. Saemus McGarvey, We Need to Talk About Kevin

Art Direction:

1. The Cabin in the Woods
2. The Deep Blue Sea
3. Flying Swords of Dragon Gate
4. Hugo
5. The Turin Horse

Costume Design:

1. The Artist
2. Damsels in Distress
3. The Deep Blue Sea
4. Hugo
5. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Make-up:

1. East Meets West
2. The Grey
3. Super 8


Sound Mixing:

1. The Deep Blue Sea
2. Hugo
3. The Tree of Life
4. The Turin Horse
5. We Need To Talk About Kevin

Sound Editing:

1. Hugo
2. Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol
3. Super 8
4. War Horse
5. We Need To Talk About Kevin

Visual Effects:

1. The Cabin in the Woods
2. Flying Swords of Dragon Gate
3. Hugo
4. Rise of the Planet of the Apes
5. Wuxia

Original Score:

1. Damsels in Distress
2. Drive
3. The Muppets
4. The Tree of Life
5. The Turin Horse

Soundtrack:

1. Company
2. The Deep Blue Sea
3. Girl Walk // All Day
4. Midnight in Paris
5. The Tree of Life

I would have loved to give more awards to The Deep Blue Sea, but Davies’s screenplay and this for soundtrack will have to do. The group singalongs give the film’s love triangle a historic perspective, one of lives shattered in a community similarly shattered by the war. Hilary Hahn’s recording of Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto makes up the rest of the soundtrack, and Davies times his camera movements and edits perfectly with the melodramatic swoops of the music. The film’s opening sequence is one of the great achievements in recent history.

They Shot Pictures Episode #11: Mikio Naruse

I’m back on the They Shot Pictures podcast this week talking about Mikio Naruse. I spent most of January watching his movies, enjoy as I mix them all up and sound more critical of Kenji Mizoguchi than I really meant to be. I hope to be on the show again in a few weeks to talk about Johnnie To (I’ve been watching as many of his movies as I can lately. I’m trying to squeeze it in before just baby #2 arrives at the end of March and brings my movie-watching (and sanity) to an end for a few months (at least).

You can download the show from the They Shot Pictures website, or look for the show on iTunes. From there you can also find my prior appearances on the Josef von Sternberg, Yasujiro Ozu and Hou Hsiao-hsien episodes, along with all the other great shows that I don’t appear on.

2012 Endy Awards, with Oscar Predictions

It’s time to announce the best of the best for 2012. Nominations and eligibility rules for the Endies can be found here.

Each Endy winner is paired with my prediction for the Academy Award winner in its category. I’ll amend this after the Oscar telecast to show the actual winners.

And the Endy goes to. . .

Best Picture:
Endy: Moonrise Kingdom
Oscar: Argo

This is a tougher choice than it looks, though Moonrise was my #1 film at the end of the year, I’d only seen it once, and all the other nominees were fresher in my mind. But I watched it again, and yeah, it’s great. Anderson’s dollhouse, DIY, 90 degree angle aesthetic is the ideal match for a children’s fantasy of adventure and escape. The need for the kids to create their own universe contrasts eloquently with the sad rigidity of the adults. Some of the other nominees are more mysterious, but no movie this year is more perfect.

Best Director:
Endy: Wes Anderson, Moonrise Kingdom
Oscar: Steven Spielberg, Lincoln
Actor:
Endy: Denis Levant, Holy Motors
Oscar: Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln

This was the toughest category for me to choose. In the end, Levant’s versitility and centrality to the film edge out Phoenix’s remarkably physical, extreme-method performance, and Day-Lewis’s uncanny ability to breathe life into an impersonation, either of which would be more than worthy winners in any other year.

Actress:
Endy: Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Oscar: Emmanuelle Riva, Amour

Another close call, but Chastain takes a character with no backstory, no personality, no apparent interests outside the plot and makes her feel like a fully-developed character, almost entirely with her eyes, body position and tone of voice. Her best scenes are when she gives her ‘action movie’ lines just the right amount of maniacal awkwardness. She doesn’t fit in, her certainty beyond that which she can prove makes her as dangerous to us as she is to bin Ladin. In a film that undermines and critiques much of what it presents, her performance is essential in pushing us to read beyond the surfaces.

Supporting Actor:
Endy: Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Oscar: Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Supporting Actress:
Endy: Amy Adams, The Master
Oscar: Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables

Original Screenplay:
Endy: Abbas Kiarostami, Like Someone in Love
Oscar: Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty

The seemingly innocuous structure of Kiarostami’s film, a series of apparently mundane conversations with wildly spinning depths that over time accumulate such weight, such possibility, that builds to a crescendo that is the year’s most shattering momentum, wins out over Boal’s screenplay that is more than just the effective distillation of a decade of history, but a radical (for Hollywood at least) rethinking of character and a fascinating, open-ended exploration of what counts as evidence and certainty in the post-Iraq War world.

Adapted Screenplay:
Endy: Tony Kushner, Lincoln
Oscar: Chris Terrio, Argo

In a year with unusually great films about argument and reason, Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty, The Master, it’s Kushner’s screenplay that is the best. He had me as soon as the President explained the complexities of the Emancipation Proclamation’s post-Civil War legal status in three minutes or less. The later rhetorical flourishes are wonderful (Stevens’s ripostes to his interlocutors, Lincoln’s powerful clothing) but the trust and clarity and efficiency of Kushner’s exposition is truly remarkable.

Argo, on the other hand, represents the worst in Hollywood rhetoric. The kind of film where someone wins an argument by emoting loudly. Where two characters bond over a hamburger by talking about their (otherwise totally irrelevant but for “character building” box-checking) divorces, even though they said they were going out for tacos.

Foreign Language Film:
Endy: Like Someone in Love
Oscar: Amour

All year this had been In Another Country for me. But after rewatching it, while I still love it, it just doesn’t resonate as strongly as the more ambitious Kiarostami and Ruiz films. This might be my favorite Kiarostami movie.

Documentary Feature:
Endy: Three Sisters
Oscar: Searching for Sugar Man
Documentary Short:

Endy: —–
Oscar: Inocente

Live Action Short:
Endy: Walker
Oscar: Death of a Shadow

Animated Short:

Endy: Paperman
Oscar: Paperman

Animated Feature:
Endy: Brave
Oscar: Wreck-It Ralph

Film Editing:
Endy: The Master
Oscar: Zero Dark Thirty

The hypnotic rhythms of The Master, perfectly synced with the film’s score and the dueling psyches of Phoenix and Hoffman win out over the masterful precision of Bigelow’s suspense sequences.

If Argo wins this award, it’ll be a bigger travesty than if it wins Best Picture. Its editing is almost incompetent. Continuity errors, needless choppiness, bizarre action mismatches. It’s a mess.

Cinematography:
Endy: Mihai Malaimare Jr., The Master
Oscar: Roger Deakins, Skyfall

Using 70mm to film interiors and close-ups rather than, as was traditional, expansive vistas and landscapes was a stroke of genius. The Master‘s images just barely win out over the old school inventiveness of Night Across the Street‘s sepia tones and rear projections and Moonrise Kingdom‘s crystal-clear storybook aesthetic.

Production Design:
Endy: Moonrise Kingdom
Oscar: Anna Karenina
Costume Design:
Endy: Moonrise Kingdom
Oscar: Anna Karenina

Make-Up:
Endy: Holy Motors
Oscar: Les Misérables
Sound Mixing:
Endy: Neighboring Sounds
Oscar: Les Misérables

Rarely is sound design more important to a modern movie than in Neighboring Sounds. It’s right there in the title. Kleber Mendonça Filho’s Recife is connected not by spatial geography, but by the way sounds bleed together in an urban environment, trumping class and racial barriers.

Sound Editing:
Endy: Zero Dark Thirty
Oscar: Argo
Visual Effects:
Endy: Night Across the Street
Oscar: Life of Pi
Original Score:
Endy: Mekong Hotel
Oscar: Life of Pi

I really want to give this to Moonrise Kingdom, for Alexandre Desplat’s suite that complements and builds upon the Hank Williams and Benjamin Britten music on the soundtrack. But Chai Datana’s guitar score for Mekong Hotel, a meandering bluesy acoustic guitar melody that wanders and swirls and circles back on itself, is fundamental to that film’s evocation of life by a river, where past and present, myth and reality fuse.

Soundtrack:
Endy: Something in the Air

Original Song:

Oscar: “Skyfall”, Skyfall

Some Notes on the 2012 Endy Awards

Yesterday I announced the nominations for this year’s Endy Awards.  Here’s a brief look at some of the nominees, in anticipation of tomorrow’s big announcement.
Films ranked by number of nominations:
10 – The Master
9 – Moonrise Kingdom
8 – Night Across the Street
7 – In Another Country
6 – Like Someone in Love & Zero Dark Thirty
5 – Django Unchained & Holy Motors
4 – Lincoln
3 – Mekong Hotel, Something in the Air & Tabu
2 – Nine films
1 – Five Films

Of the five Best Picture/Director nominees, four are directors who have previously won Endies:

Abbas Kiarostami in 1997 for Taste of Cherry (Film Editing), 1999 for The Wind Will Carry Us (Foreign Language Film) and 2010 for Certified Copy (Best Picture, Foreign Language Film).

Paul Thomas Anderson in 1997 for Boogie Nights (Best Picture, Director, Original Screenplay), 1999 for Magnolia (Original Screenplay), 2002 for Punch-Drunk Love (Best Picture) and in 2007 for There Will Be Blood (Adapted Screenplay)

Wes Anderson in 2001 for The Royal Tenenbaums (Best Original Screenplay) and 2009 for Fantastic Mr. Fox (Adapted Screenplay and Animated Feature)

Hong Sangsoo in 2010 for Oki’s Movie and Hahaha (Best Original Screenplay).

If I ever get around to revising these awards (most of which I handed out back in 2008, four and a half long years worth of movie-watching ago), the fifth nominee, Raúl Ruiz, will likely pick up an award or two for his 2010 film Mysteries of Lisbon.

So, will this year see the first Best Picture win after several award-winning screenplays for Wes Anderson? Will Hong Sangsoo become the first Korean filmmaker to win Picture or Director? Will Abbas Kiarostami accomplish the rare feat of winning Best Picture with back-to-back films, something only Terrence Malick (with The New World and Tree of Life), Alfred Hitchcock (North by Northwest and Psycho) and Powell & Pressburger (Black Narcissus and The Red Shoes) have done before? Or will longtime Endy favorite Paul Thomas Anderson pick up his third Best Picture Endy, making him the most decorated filmmaker of his generation? Tune in tomorrow morning to find out.

Endy Nominations: 2012

Reviving a tradition I had to abandon last year after spending the second half of 2011 in a baby-induced movie-free zone, it’s time to nominate some movies for some end of the year awards.  I’ll list the nominees in each category here, and then on Saturday publish the winners, along with my predictions for the winners of that other set of awards. As always when assigning dates here at The End, movies are categorized based on their imdb date, which means that a number of films that would be Endy favorites (Damsels in Distress, Margaret, The Deep Blue Sea, etc) are not eligible for this year while several films that won’t open theatrically in the US until 2013 are eligilbe.

Best Picture:

1. In Another Country
2. Like Someone in Love
3. The Master
4. Moonrise Kingdom
5. Night Across the Street
Best Director:
1. Hong Sangsoo, In Another Country
2. Abbas Kiarostami, Like Someone in Love
3. Paul Thomas Anderson, The Master
4. Wes Anderson, Moonrise Kingdom
5. Raul Ruiz, Night Across the Street
Best Actor:
1. Jean-Louis Trintignant, Amour
2. Denis Levant, Holy Motors 
3. Tadashi Okuno, Like Someone in Love
4. Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
5. Joaquin Phoenix, The Master
Best Actress:
1. Emmanuelle Riva, Amour
2. Isabelle Huppert, In Another Country
3. Santi Ahumada, Thursday Till Sunday
4. Nai An, When Night Falls
5. Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Supporting Actor:
1. Ben Whishaw, Could Atlas
2. Samuel L. Jackson, Django Unchained
3. Yu Jun-sang, In Another Country
4. Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
5. Gustavo Jahn, Neighboring Sounds
Supporting Actress:
1. Amy Adams, The Master
2. Samantha Barks, Les Misérables
3. Lola Créton, Something in the Air
4. Ana Moreira, Tabu
5. Jennifer Ehle, Zero Dark Thirty

Original Screenplay:
1. Hong Sangsoo, In Another Country
2. Abbas Kiarostami, Like Someone in Love
3. Paul Thomas Anderson, The Master
4. Wes Anderson & Roman Coppola, Moonrise Kingdom
5. Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
Adapted Screenplay:
1. Wachowskis & Tykwer, Cloud Atlas

2. David Cronenberg, Cosmopolis
3. Li Luo, Emperor Visits the Hell
4. Tony Kushner, Lincoln
5. Raul Ruiz, Night Across the Street
Foreign Language Film:
1. Holy Motors
2. In Another Country
3. Like Someone in Love
4. Mekong Hotel
5. Night Across the Street
Documentary Feature:
1. In Search of Haydn
2. People’s Park
3. Reconversão
4. Shut Up and Play the Hits
5. Three Sisters
Animated Feature:
1. Brave
2. Wreck-It Ralph

Animated Short:
1. The Longest Daycare
2. Paperman

Live Action Short:

1. My Way (Ann Hui)
2. Walker (Tsai Ming-Liang)
3. You Are More than Beautiful (Kim Tae-young)

Film Editing:
1. The Last Time I Saw Macao
2. The Master
3. Moonrise Kingdom
4. Night Across the Street
5. Zero Dark Thirty
Cinematography:
1. Katsumi Yanagijima, Like Someone in Love
2. Mihai Malaimare Jr., The Master
3. Robert D. Yeoman , Moonrise Kingdom
4. Inti Briones, Night Across the Street
5. Rui Poças, Tabu

Art Direction:

1. Cosmopolis
2. Lincoln
3. Moonrise Kingdom
4. Night Across the Street
5. Skyfall
Costume Design:

1. Django Unchained
2. Holy Motors
3. Moonrise Kingdom
4. Night Across the Street
5. Something in the Air
Make-up:
1. Holy Motors
2. Lincoln
3. Django Unchained

Sound Mixing:
1. Django Unchained
2. The Master
3. Mekong Hotel
4. Neighboring Sounds
5. Shut Up and Play the Hits
Sound Editing:
1. The Avengers
2. Django Unchained
3. Flight
4. Skyfall
5. Zero Dark Thirty
Visual Effects:
1. The Avengers

2. Flight
3. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

4. Night Across the Street
5. Prometheus

Original Score:
1. In Another Country
2. The Master
3. Mekong Hotel
4. Moonrise Kingdom
5. Zero Dark Thirty
Soundtrack:

1. Holy Motors
2. Les Misérables
3. Moonrise Kingdom
4. Something in the Air
5. Tabu